Yegna tube #Ethiopia: The TPLF is like PFDJ ruling political party of the State of Eritrea

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The Eritrean People’s Liberation Front (EPLF), later (from 1994) People’s Front for Democracy and Justice, formed from the secessionist movement that successfully fought for the creation of an independent Eritrean nation out of the northernmost province of Ethiopia in 1993.

The historical region of Eritrea had joined Ethiopia as an autonomous unit in 1952. The Eritrean Liberation Movement was founded in 1958 and was succeeded by the Eritrean Liberation Front (ELF) in 1961. The ELF grew in membership when the Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie abolished Eritrea’s autonomous status, annexing it as a province in 1962. In the 1960s and 1970s the ELF undertook a systematic campaign of guerrilla warfare against the Ethiopian government. A faction of the ELF broke away in 1970 to form the Eritrean People’s Liberation Front. The EPLF managed to secure control of much of the Eritrean countryside and build effective administrations in the areas it controlled. Fighting that broke out between the EPLF, ELF, and other Eritrean rebel groups in 1981 prevented further military gains, but the EPLF subsequently emerged as the principal Eritrean guerrilla group.

As Soviet support of Ethiopia’s socialist government collapsed in the late 1980s, the EPLF formed an alliance with guerrilla groups in Tigray province and other parts of Ethiopia, and, when these groups overthrew the central government and captured the Ethiopian capital in May 1991, the EPLF formed a separate provisional government for Eritrea. After the holding of a United Nations-supervised referendum on independence there in April 1993, the EPLF declared the new nation of Eritrea the following month.

At the third congress of the EPLF Front in February 1994, delegates voted to transform the 95,000‐person organization into a mass political movement, that is the People's Front for Democracy and Justice (PFDJ). The congress gave the PFDJ a transitional mandate to draw the general population into the political process and to prepare the country for constitutional democracy

The leader of the PFDJ party and current President of Eritrea is Isaias Afewerki.

 

Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn says the continent has all it takes to determine its future if it structurally transforms its economies in the interest of citizens. His view was contained in opening remarks made at the start of the African Economic Conference 2017 being held in the capital Addis Ababa. “Africa has the opportunity to determine its own future and cannot fail to structurally transform its economies for the benefit of its people. This is not time for indecisiveness and passivity,” he was quoted by state-owned FBC to have said. displayAdvert("mpu_3") Africa has the opportunity to determine its own future and cannot fail to structurally transform its economies for the benefit of its people. This is not time for indecisiveness and passivity. The conference which runs between Monday December 4 to Wednesday December 6 is under the theme ‘Governance for structural transformation.’ It is under the auspices of the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), the African Development Bank (AfDB) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). African Economic Conference has kicked off in #AddisAbaba and we have ?from the opening ceremony: https://t.co/RnRTkYSD2s This year’s theme is #Governance for structural transformation and you can follow #2017AEC for" />
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The Eritrean People’s Liberation Front (EPLF), later (from 1994) People’s Front for Democracy and Justice, formed from the secessionist movement that successfully fought for the creation of an independent Eritrean nation out of the northernmost province of Ethiopia in 1993.

The historical region of Eritrea had joined Ethiopia as an autonomous unit in 1952. The Eritrean Liberation Movement was founded in 1958 and was succeeded by the Eritrean Liberation Front (ELF) in 1961. The ELF grew in membership when the Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie abolished Eritrea’s autonomous status, annexing it as a province in 1962. In the 1960s and 1970s the ELF undertook a systematic campaign of guerrilla warfare against the Ethiopian government. A faction of the ELF broke away in 1970 to form the Eritrean People’s Liberation Front. The EPLF managed to secure control of much of the Eritrean countryside and build effective administrations in the areas it controlled. Fighting that broke out between the EPLF, ELF, and other Eritrean rebel groups in 1981 prevented further military gains, but the EPLF subsequently emerged as the principal Eritrean guerrilla group.

As Soviet support of Ethiopia’s socialist government collapsed in the late 1980s, the EPLF formed an alliance with guerrilla groups in Tigray province and other parts of Ethiopia, and, when these groups overthrew the central government and captured the Ethiopian capital in May 1991, the EPLF formed a separate provisional government for Eritrea. After the holding of a United Nations-supervised referendum on independence there in April 1993, the EPLF declared the new nation of Eritrea the following month.

At the third congress of the EPLF Front in February 1994, delegates voted to transform the 95,000‐person organization into a mass political movement, that is the People's Front for Democracy and Justice (PFDJ). The congress gave the PFDJ a transitional mandate to draw the general population into the political process and to prepare the country for constitutional democracy

The leader of the PFDJ party and current President of Eritrea is Isaias Afewerki.

 

Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn says the continent has all it takes to determine its future if it structurally transforms its economies in the interest of citizens. His view was contained in opening remarks made at the start of the African Economic Conference 2017 being held in the capital Addis Ababa. “Africa has the opportunity to determine its own future and cannot fail to structurally transform its economies for the benefit of its people. This is not time for indecisiveness and passivity,” he was quoted by state-owned FBC to have said. displayAdvert("mpu_3") Africa has the opportunity to determine its own future and cannot fail to structurally transform its economies for the benefit of its people. This is not time for indecisiveness and passivity. The conference which runs between Monday December 4 to Wednesday December 6 is under the theme ‘Governance for structural transformation.’ It is under the auspices of the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), the African Development Bank (AfDB) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). African Economic Conference has kicked off in #AddisAbaba and we have ?from the opening ceremony: https://t.co/RnRTkYSD2s This year’s theme is #Governance for structural transformation and you can follow #2017AEC for
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