Ethio 360 Zare Min Ale Wed 31 July 2019

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In his inaugural address to the Region in particular, and the country at large following his parliamentary endorsement, Temesgen, 44, did not shy away from first praising the regional parliament in particular, and the Amhara people as a whole for honoring and thus generously providing him with this opportunity to lead the proud populace of Amhara whom he publicly qualifies as wise, inclusive, hard-working, brave, thoughtful, loving, humane, selfless, religious and culturally rich, among others.

Policy directives aimed at spearheading his forthcoming plan of action

Amhara regional state is known for its abundant natural and strategic resources such as tourism and mining, both of which never tapped to a full extent and exploited for the lasting and multiple benefit of the broader inhabitants therein and the concomitant improvement of their basic livelihoods at best. Hence, there is no wonder if the key and central message of the newly appointed president’s acceptance speech largely revolved around three important and interdependent priorities: striving for sustainable peace with the enforcement of the rule of law; promoting private investment; and creating job opportunities for the unemployed youth out there in staggering numbers.

In addition to this, the mainstream focus of his fairly articulated speech has touched on the longstanding identity and border disputes which the Amhara regional state is experiencing with its neighboring regional states, especially that with Tigray. Giving due recognition to the lingering problem that looms large, Temesgen has made it unequivocally clear that no violent means and methods will ever be applied to resolve the existing identity and border misunderstandings and disputes with our neighboring regions. According to him, only legal and peaceful mechanisms will be utilized in an utmost collaboration together with the relevant bodies, although he gave little or no explanation of details of his proposal.

Arguably, it remains to be seen, regardless of its gentle and stabilizing tone, how his modest and conciliatory approach to the already toxic and distasteful political environment will play out particularly in view of the stringent and dire position of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) which has recently declared to distance itself from “working closely” with ADP, leave alone desiring to negotiate the territorial status-quo. Further polarizing the two regional states ability to work together in good faith is also the counter response issued by the ADP a day after TPLF’s statement was issued.

Category
Politics
The United Nations Human Rights chief, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, will be in Ethiopia between May 2 – 4 at the invitation of the government. He will meet with Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, the speaker of parliament and other top government officials to discuss issues of human rights and the work of the UN office in the country. He is expected to hold a press conference to round up his visit. Ethiopian human rights have been a top issue following anti-government protests and attendant security clampdown which led to deaths and mass arrests. displayAdvert("mpu_3") His talks with African Union officials will focus on plans to reinforce coordination between the UN and AU on human rights. The UN rights body officially requested to send independent investigators, a position that was rejected by Addis Ababa. The PM stated last week that Ethiopia was competent enough to probe the deaths. The country’s human rights outfit in a recent report stated that 669 people were killed as a result of the protests and the parliament directed subsequently that security officers found culpable of highhandedness be prosecuted. The country has been under a state-of-emergency since October 2016. Hundreds of protesters were arrested, some have been released after" />
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In his inaugural address to the Region in particular, and the country at large following his parliamentary endorsement, Temesgen, 44, did not shy away from first praising the regional parliament in particular, and the Amhara people as a whole for honoring and thus generously providing him with this opportunity to lead the proud populace of Amhara whom he publicly qualifies as wise, inclusive, hard-working, brave, thoughtful, loving, humane, selfless, religious and culturally rich, among others.

Policy directives aimed at spearheading his forthcoming plan of action

Amhara regional state is known for its abundant natural and strategic resources such as tourism and mining, both of which never tapped to a full extent and exploited for the lasting and multiple benefit of the broader inhabitants therein and the concomitant improvement of their basic livelihoods at best. Hence, there is no wonder if the key and central message of the newly appointed president’s acceptance speech largely revolved around three important and interdependent priorities: striving for sustainable peace with the enforcement of the rule of law; promoting private investment; and creating job opportunities for the unemployed youth out there in staggering numbers.

In addition to this, the mainstream focus of his fairly articulated speech has touched on the longstanding identity and border disputes which the Amhara regional state is experiencing with its neighboring regional states, especially that with Tigray. Giving due recognition to the lingering problem that looms large, Temesgen has made it unequivocally clear that no violent means and methods will ever be applied to resolve the existing identity and border misunderstandings and disputes with our neighboring regions. According to him, only legal and peaceful mechanisms will be utilized in an utmost collaboration together with the relevant bodies, although he gave little or no explanation of details of his proposal.

Arguably, it remains to be seen, regardless of its gentle and stabilizing tone, how his modest and conciliatory approach to the already toxic and distasteful political environment will play out particularly in view of the stringent and dire position of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) which has recently declared to distance itself from “working closely” with ADP, leave alone desiring to negotiate the territorial status-quo. Further polarizing the two regional states ability to work together in good faith is also the counter response issued by the ADP a day after TPLF’s statement was issued.

Category
Politics
The United Nations Human Rights chief, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, will be in Ethiopia between May 2 – 4 at the invitation of the government. He will meet with Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, the speaker of parliament and other top government officials to discuss issues of human rights and the work of the UN office in the country. He is expected to hold a press conference to round up his visit. Ethiopian human rights have been a top issue following anti-government protests and attendant security clampdown which led to deaths and mass arrests. displayAdvert("mpu_3") His talks with African Union officials will focus on plans to reinforce coordination between the UN and AU on human rights. The UN rights body officially requested to send independent investigators, a position that was rejected by Addis Ababa. The PM stated last week that Ethiopia was competent enough to probe the deaths. The country’s human rights outfit in a recent report stated that 669 people were killed as a result of the protests and the parliament directed subsequently that security officers found culpable of highhandedness be prosecuted. The country has been under a state-of-emergency since October 2016. Hundreds of protesters were arrested, some have been released after
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